Iron Speed adds SharePoint backing to database app tool

The latest version of Visual Studio also is supported in Iron Speed Designer 7.1

Iron Speed released this week an upgraded version of its Iron Speed Designer database application tool, which adds support for Microsoft's SharePoint collaboration platform.

Version 7.1 of Iron Speed Designer enables developers to implement SharePoint applications without special software development knowledge, the company said. The tool also generates database applications for .Net and cloud environments.

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"There is one very critical aspect about the tool that sets it apart from others. Iron Speed Designer delivers 'database-driven' SharePoint apps.  That's not something you can do with other SharePoint facilities," said Alan Fisher, co-founder of Iron Speed, in a statement released by the company.

SharePoint applications can be generated from an existing database. Developers do not need to know ASPX, .Net, or SharePoint APIs, Iron Speed said. SharePoint 2007 and 2010 and Windows SharePoint Services are supported.

Iron Speed Designer 7.1 also supports Microsoft's Visual Studio 2010 IDE, but users do not need the IDE.

Version 7.1 runs on Windows platforms and generates .Net Web applications for the Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, Microsoft Access, and MySQL databases.

Single-developer pricing for the enterprise edition of Iron Speed Designer starts at $2,295.

This article, "Iron Speed adds SharePoint backing to database app tool," was originally published at InfoWorld.com. Follow the latest developments in business technology news and get a digest of the key stories each day in the InfoWorld Daily newsletter.

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This story, "Iron Speed adds SharePoint backing to database app tool" was originally published by InfoWorld.

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