Symantec Vision Conference: Total Control

Symantec's Security DLP and Compliance Products Are Harmonized

There is no end to systems security fear, and the recent attacks on Google and others showed large organizations that even organizations with smarts can be penetrated and robbed. Symantec drove this home in their Symantec Vision 2010 Conference, the replacement venue for Symantec's Altiris ManageFusion conferences. Total Control is the marketing mantra, and Symantec gets ever closer to not only total control, but touches on Microsoft and Adobe territory with revamped data loss protection rights management components.

Part of the data loss prevention now extends to social media traffic, such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, MySpace, Linked-In, and others. The idea is prevent users from transmitting sensitive data, although systematically, it's not a totally foolproof system as IT doesn't control all of the access points, and some conversations simply can't be monitored. Nonetheless, it's an interesting step forward in DLP.

But what of personal tweets, as an example? Like, "I sure think I can afford that new Lexus now!" or "Looks like we're going to have to move again just after I got this job with Foobarish Software." Communiques over social networks have implications that are going to be difficult to control. Privacy issues? Tell it to the SEC. Yet social networks are incredibly revealing and people don't realize just how much of their lives (and correlating business information) gets buzzed out for the world to see. Symantec is brave here; I'm guessing the bravery will be rewarded.

Interesting still is the Corporate Compliance Suite V10.0. Even the name strikes fear, doesn't it? Beyond the guilt implications, this package is said to tightly integrate with Symantec's Data Loss Prevention (DLP) suite. Some will groan, a few corporate counselors will silently nod their heads up and down.

And so, this is the era of compliance and policy controls personified in an interesting suite of updated product groups. Would we need these security components in a more perfect world? Yes. Nothing is foolproof, because fools are so ingenious.

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