Pod Slurping – An easy technique for stealing data

A common misconception is that perimeter security measures such as firewalls and anti-virus software are enough to secure corporate data residing on the corporate network. In this white paper, we explore how the uncontrolled use of portable storage devices such as iPods, USB sticks, flash drives and PDAs, coupled with data theft techniques such as ‘pod slurping’, can lead to major security breaches.

Introduction

Our dependency on technology has never ceased to grow. Increased portability, ease of use, stylish looks and a good dose of marketing hype are the perfect cocktail to entice the population at large! Suppliers of consumer electronics are registering an ever increasing demand for portable consumer electronics. Apple’s iPod for example, is one of the most successful electronic gadgets in the world. Since the iPod launch in 2001, Apple have sold almost 60 million units (CNNMoney.com, 2006). iPod has become a universally appealing source of audio entertainment – the eponym for MP3 players. Projections show that the demand for iPods and other MP3 flash-memory music players will continue on a positive trend and will surge to nearly 124 million units in 2009 (Kevorkian, 2005).

As the popularity of iPods continues to grow, an alarming army of white earphones is slowly taking over the workplace. In fact, these MP3 players have become as common in any workplace as they are on public transport. But what is so alarming about having iPods and MP3 players at work?

Pod slurping: How can insiders steal your data?

Developments in portable device and data storage technology are escalating. The latest versions of MP3 players and flash memory devices have huge storage capabilities; yet these gadgets are small enough to easily conceal and sneak in behind the corporate line of defence. Further to this, easy connectivity and high speed data transfer has become increasingly more widespread – a user may simply plug the device into a USB or FireWire port and they are up and running – no drivers or configuration required! In practice, this means that a data thief can get away with even more precious data, and a negligent employee can dump more viruses onto the corporate network even when connecting for only a short time...

Download the free document at: Pod-slurping Article

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