Cisco recalls 95,000 ADSL power adapters

Cisco Systems Inc. is recalling about 95,000 power adapters it sold worldwide because of overheating problems, a U.S. consumer safety group said Tuesday.

The adapters, which are used with certain Cisco ADSL (asymmetric digital subscriber line) routers, can overheat and melt a hole through the housing, posing a fire hazard. In addition, the resulting exposed wires pose an electric shock hazard, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) said in a statement.

Cisco has received only one report so far of a unit overheating, and no property damage or injuries were reported, the CPSC said.

The adapters are used with six different models of router sold for use in homes and small offices. They were sold through service providers and distributors worldwide between April 2000 and September 2001, the CPSC said.

The power adapters shipped with Cisco's 827, 827-4V, 826, SOHO77, SOHO77-50 and 827-EUR routers, the group said. The small, black adapters carry the part number 34-0949-02.

Customers who purchased affected adapters should stop using them immediately and contact Cisco for a free replacement, the CPSC said.

A Cisco spokesman said the company contacted the CPSC after it was alerted of the danger by a user.

"We did some testing and decided to take the cautious approach and initiate the recall," the spokesman said.

Cisco, in San Jose, California, can be reached at +1-408-526-4000 or http://www.cisco.com/. The CPSC, in Bethesda, Maryland, can be reached at +1-301-504-0990, or on the Web at http://www.cpsc.gov/.

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