Server, embedded Linux top show's agenda

-- As day one of the LinuxWorld conference and exposition got under way in New York Wednesday, product announcements related to Linux in the server and embedded markets led the way.

Here are some of the announcements made at the show:

  • embedded Linux operating system vendor Lineo Inc. launched its SecureEdge OEM (original equipment manufacturer) development platform for Linux-based appliances and devices. SecureEdge replaces the company's previous hardware brand, known as NETtel, which referred to Linux-based Net appliances for secure networking. OEMs for SecureEdge include Crossport Systems, LinuxWizardry Inc. and Enterasys Networks Inc., Lineo said in a statement. Lineo also announced the acquisition of Houston-based Embedded Power Corp., a company that specializes in RTOSes (real-time operating systems) for DSPs (digital signal processors) and microprocessors. The pair didn't reveal the specific terms of the purchase. Lineo has acquired Embedded Power as a way to broaden its processor support, the company said in a statement. Lineo, based in Lindon, Utah, can be reached at +1-801-426-5001 or via the Internet at http://www.lineo.com/.
  • some of the components of Dell Computer Corp.'s OpenManage server management suite of tools now can run on servers powered by Red Hat Inc.'s Linux distribution, versions 6.2 and 7.0, Dell announced at the show. The components cover features such as advanced installation and set-up support as well as remote management. The Dell tools can be downloaded from the company's Web site and will begin shipping with the vendor's PowerEdge servers running Red Hat Linux later this year. Dell, based in Round Rock, Texas, can be reached at +1-512-338-4400 or via the Internet at http://www.dell.com/.
  • IBM Corp. subsidiary Lotus Development Corp. announced its Domino Workflow software now supports Linux and can be downloaded from the Lotus Web site. Specifically, Domino Workflow Engine 2.1.1 (server) runs on SuSE Linux 7.0, Red Hat Linux 6.2, TurboLinux 6.0 and Caldera OpenLinux eServer 2.3, Lotus said in a statement. Suggested pricing for Domino Workflow for Linux begins at US$9,995 per server and $60 per workflow participant, according to Lotus. CDs of the software are due to ship later in the first quarter of this calendar year. Lotus, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, can be reached at +1-617-577-8500 or via the Internet at http://www.lotus.com/.
  • SteelEye Technology Inc. took the wraps off its LifeKeeper for Linux 3.1 clustering platform as well as confirming that Compaq Computer Corp. is to use the clustering software on its ProLiant servers. The companies have signed a joint marketing agreement to promote LifeKeeper on ProLiant servers and storage systems. LifeKeeper is designed to ensure continuous availability of mission-critical applications through the use of standard clustering technologies, SteelEye said in a statement. Linux distributions already supported include Red Hat 7.0, Caldera eServer 2.3 and SuSE 7.1. SteelEye plans to support TurboLinux in the second quarter of this year. LifeKeeper for Linux 3.1 should be generally available in March, with prices starting at $1,500 per node. SteelEye, based in Mountain View, California , can be reached at +1-650-318-0108 or via the Internet at http://www.steeleye.com/.
  • Computer Associates International Inc. (CA) introduced its systems and networks management software Unicenter TNG (the next generation) Performance Neugents for Linux. The software employs CA's Neugents technology to automatically recognize atypical behavior on monitored Linux systems, according to the company. Neugents can also learn and adapt to changes on individual systems, CA added in a statement. The software vendor also announced its Unicenter TNG CMO (cluster management option) is in beta testing. CMO manages server-cluster software from Linux distribution vendors as well as Compaq, Hewlett-Packard Co., IBM, Sun Microsystems Inc. and Microsoft Corp., CA said in a statement.
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