Coolest house in the world: A Boeing 727

Big old jet airliner now large nerdy home.

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Credit: REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

Perhaps it is just a nerd’s delight, but Bruce Campbell, a former electrical engineer has made a Boeing 727 airliner his home – well for six months out of the year anyway. He spent about $220,000 to get the airliner into the kind of shape he could live in. “When properly executed, the remarkable appeal of a retired jetliner as a home springs from the magnificent technology and beauty of the sculptured structure itself. Jetliners are masterful works of aerospace science, and their superlative engineering grace is unmatched by any other structures people can live within. They're incredibly strong, durable, and long lived. And they easily withstand any earthquake or storm,” Campbell wrote on his blog about the aircraft. Take a quick look.

airliner
Credit: REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

A rapid increase in the number of aircraft reaching the end of their economic life presents considerable opportunities for the aircraft dismantling and recycling industry, according to the study. Industry operators predict that between 1,200 and 1,800 aircraft will be dismantled, recycled or torn down over the next three years, according to the Aircraft Fleet Recycling Association. Bruce Campbell has transformed a retired Boeing 727 into a living space in Portland.

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Credit: REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

Campbell sits on his futon bed while using a laptop in his Boeing 727 home in the woods outside the suburbs of Portland, Ore.

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Credit: REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

Campbell shaves in his Boeing 727 home.

airliners as homes
Credit: REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

Campbell brushes his teeth at a sink in his Boeing 727 home. To save retired jetliners from becoming scrap metal by reusing them, Campbell, 64, is one of a small number of people worldwide who have transformed retired aircraft into a living space or other creative project, according to Reuters.

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Credit: REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

Look at the Plexiglas floor of this Boeing 727 home.

Credit: REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

A full sized bathroom for this airplane home. None of those tiny airplane bathrooms here -- mostly.

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Credit: REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

A real flight simulator, right in your living room.

airliners
Credit: REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

Despite the modifications one thing that has not changed on board is the food, preparation. Campbell told the Mirror that he cooks with a microwave or toaster and east mostly canned food and cereal.

Credit: REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

Former electrical engineer Campbell stands at the entranceway to his 727. He said of his jet home: “Their interior is easy to keep immaculately clean because they are sealed pressure canisters, so dust and insects can't intrude from the outside. And they're quite secure - when all the doors are closed and locked, they're highly resistant to intruders. So the human hearts inside feel wonderfully safe and comfortable.”

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Credit: Reuters

Not your average Cape with a white picket fence. Campbell told the Mirror: "'I think most people are nerds in their hearts in some measure. The point is to have fun."

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A look from above.