Wicked cool 3D printer creations

3D printing can invite rapid development of technical and not so technical inventions

Credit: Reuters

First we take a look at how 3D printing works.

3D printing
Credit: REUTERS/Yves Herman

3D printing is rapidly changing a number of communities – the manufacturing of medical devices for one. Experts say the real 3D revolution will come when designers start to rethink the shapes of objects. Here we take a look at some cool recent 3D printer-based inventions.

3D printing
Credit: REUTERS/Yves Herman

A combination photo shows a 3D model of a complex anaplastology case. The health science involves prosthetic rehabilitation the face or body.

3D printing
Credit: REUTERS/Yves Herman

Here Vanessa Palsenbarg, Corporate Communications Specialist at Belgian company Materialise, the biggest 3D printer in Europe, shows a 3D model called Burn Mask, a customized mask for facial scars.

3D printing
Credit: REUTERS/Yves Herman

A 3D model called the Melonia Shoe. 

3D printing
Credit: REUTERS/Yves Herman

3D vase called The Hidd, designed by Dan Yeffetlamp.

3D printing
Credit: REUTERS/Yves Herman

A 3D table lamp called the Lotus.

3D printing
Credit: REUTERS/Yves Herman

A 3D object called the Quin.MGX.

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Credit: REUTERS/Thomas Peter

A picture shows a twisted rotor that was made by means of 3D printing. The rotor was created by Gismo and can be used in miniature wind turbines.

3D printing
Credit: REUTERS/Thomas Peter

The figures are 3D printed representations of the original models that were recorded with 3D scanning technology by Gismo.

3D printing
Credit: REUTERS/Yves Herman

Wilfried Vancraen, chief executive of Belgian company Materialise, the biggest 3D printer in Europe next to 3D designed objects at the company’s headquarters in Leuven.

3D printing
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Vancraen poses with more of the firm’s 3D designed objects at the company’s headquarters in Leuven.

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Credit: REUTERS/Yves Herman

Materialise 3D KOL/MAC one piece Root Chair.

3D printing
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A technician operates a Materialise patented Mammoth stereolithography machine, capable of printing parts of up to 2100x680x800mm in one piece, to create 3D objects.

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Credit: REUTERS/Issei Kato

Here a woman holds a piece of chocolate made in the shape of her face at a chocolate making workshop by KS Design Lab offers classes ahead of Valentine’s Day for making personalized gifts, by turning one’s face into a chocolate treat for their significant other. Participants of the workshop first scan their faces and edit the data using a computer software. The data is then sent to a 3D printer to produce silicon molds which chocolate is eventually poured into.

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Credit: REUTERS/Rick Wilking

A Sculpteo 3DPCase iPhone case featuring two faces looking at each other. The case was created by a customer using the companies app to custom build a case using a 3D printer.

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Credit: REUTERS/Makerbot Industries LLC

Three-dimensional printer “The Replicator” made by Makerbot Industries LLC. 3D printer makers are now offering increasingly less expensive, easy-to-use models.

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Credit: REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

The 3D printer MakerBot Replicator 2 at the CeBit computer fair in Hanover, Germany.