10 things we love/hate about Evernote

The best (and worst) of the popular note-taking app.

Evernote

Launched in 2008, Evernote has emerged as one of the most popular note-taking applications. It functions as a cloud service that automatically syncs your notes across the computers and mobile devices you use in your daily life. Evernote Corp. revealed in March that the service had been breached by hackers. The company encouraged users to change their passwords, and has since implemented two-factor authentication. We decided to take a look at the current state of Evernote since this unfortunate incident.

Related: Google Keep vs. OneNote vs. Evernote: We name the note-app winner

Evernote

Evernote has native applications for nearly every major OS: Android, BlackBerry OS, iOS, Windows and Windows Phone. Recently, Evernote released a Windows 8 app version. There’s even an official Evernote app for HP’s failed mobile OS, webOS, but sadly, no love for any distribution of Linux. (There is, though, an unofficial Evernote client for Ubuntu, called Everpad.)

Evernote

Across most of its platform versions, Evernote has tools for you to change the formatting of text: bold, italics, underline, subscript, superscript, strikethrough, font color, font type, and font size. Text can be set left, center or right, or formatted into a bulleted or numbered list. Evernote also sells a Premium service ($5 a month) that archives previous versions of your notes, so you can figuratively go back in time, and reuse elements from older versions of a note that you want to restore.

Evernote

Enter a word or phrase into Evernote’s built-in search tool, and it will pull up your notes containing that text or that are tagged with keywords or location information. It also includes text-recognition technology so when you capture or upload an image with words depicted in it, the Evernote servers will try to recognize the words, which will then be included in your searches. If you upgrade to a Premium account, Evernote’s servers will process images that contain printed or handwritten text faster.

Evernote

You can embed audio or video into a note by uploading the media file from your computer or device, or recording an audio clip through your computer’s or device’s mic. (The website version of Evernote lacks the capability of letting you record audio.)

Evernote

You can add a to-do checklist to a note by using the text-editing toolbar to insert a checkbox. It then lets you enter, line-by-line, text naming a task, and a checkbox will be automatically placed to the left of each entry.

Evernote

The desktop application versions of Evernote let you export your notes into HTML, Microsoft MHT or XML format.

Evernote

Evernote graphically presents your notes as rectangle or square cards with titles and snippets of the first lines of text within it and with a thumbnail of an image that may be attached to it. Across Evernote’s desktop application, mobile app and website versions, the GUIs are dressed in a theme that emphasizes text set against white space with accents of gray, light blue, and the Evernote brand’s felt green. They have the spare, utilitarian look of a file manager.

Evernote

You can share your notes with others as a URL link or send as an email; recipients can view but not edit your card. Only when you upgrade to a Premium account can you permit other Evernote users to edit notes that you share with them. There are other note-taking tools, such as Springpad, that don’t charge you to use their services for online collaboration.

Evernote

Evernote locks your notes in the cloud, unless you go Premium. Then your notes can be used offline -- but only on your Android or iOS device -- to edit and view during moments when you don’t have a mobile internet connection.

Evernote

Evernote restricts your monthly upload to 60MB. Premium will grant you a 1GB per month limit. The 60MB allotment can get quickly eaten up if you need to attach images or media files to several note cards, especially since each note is restricted in size to 25MB, which includes whatever files you attach to it. (A Premium account will bump this up to 100MB.)