Techiest U.S. postal stamps of all time

Word is that Apple co-founder Steve Jobs will be commemorated on U.S. stamp in 2015

stamps

Word that Apple co-founder Steve Jobs is slated to be honored on a commemorative stamp by the U.S. Postal Service in 2015 got us wondering about how techies have been represented over the years on stamps. Here’s a look (made possible via the U.S. Stamp Gallery):

Alexander Graham Bell (1940, 1977)
Alexander Graham Bell (1940, 1977)

His research into hearing and speech resulted in the invention of the telephone, for which he received a U.S. patent in 1876.

World Wide Web (2000)
World Wide Web (2000)

Who ever thought they’d see HTTP on a stamp? This stamp commemorates Tim Berners-Lee’s 1989 proposal that changed everything.

Cellular phones (2000)
Cellular phones (2000)

They truly are everywhere now, even on stamps. The first cell phone demoed in 1973 weighed more than 2 pounds.

Desk Telephone (2011)
Desk Telephone (2011)

Harry Dreyfuss won the “phone of the future” competition by Bell Labs in 1929 and built this black beauty.

Video games (2000)
Video games (2000)

Remember when kids used to collect stamps? Back before video games took off in the 1980s?

Albert Einstein (1966, 1979)
Albert Einstein (1966, 1979)

His general theory of relativity was good for more than one stamp appearance.

American inventors, including Nikola Tesla (1983)
American inventors, including Nikola Tesla (1983)

Telsa emigrated from Europe to the U.S. in 1884 to work for Thomas Edison.  He went on to patent the AC induction motor and more.

Lasers (1999)
Lasers (1999)

The term laser originated as an acronym for "light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation." Today, they help enable everything from printers to fiber-optic networks.

Virtual Reality (2000)
Virtual Reality (2000)

A real stamp in honor of this computer-simulated technology that has found usefulness everywhere from the military to games to teleconferencing.

John von Neumann (2005)
John von Neumann (2005)

This applied mathematician contributed to many fields during the early-to-mid 1990s, including computer science.

Dr. Bunsen Honeydew and Beaker (2005)
Dr. Bunsen Honeydew and Beaker (2005)

Two of the geekiest and best Muppets.

Edwin Hubble (2008)
Edwin Hubble (2008)

The Hubble Space Telescope bears this famous astronomer’s name.

Computer Technology (1996)
Computer Technology (1996)

Back when computers were….big.

Integrated Circuit (1999)
Integrated Circuit (1999)

These typically silicon-based microchips have revolutionized electronics, with key contributions from Jack Kilby and Robert Noyce most notable in the U.S.

Computer art and graphics (2000)
Computer art and graphics (2000)

It’s not all about number crunching.