Apple finally ups data protection for users

Pathflickr/Robert Scoble
Path Co-Founder and CEO Dave Morin shows off his iPhone.

After an embarrassing week of data abuse stories, Apple finally clamps down on app data permissions.

Even Congress got into the act, asking Apple some pointed questions about the number of apps uploading address books without permission. Minutes later, an Apple spokesman said such actions are against their guidelines, but they will push an update soon to force developers to get user approval in the future. No timetable was included in the statement to AllThingsD.

Add this to the outrage last April when a location tracking file hidden deep inside the iPhone became public, and privacy advocates remain wary of Apple's grasp of appropriate user data handling. The other side of the argument is that apps need user data to provide the location and connection features many iPhone owners prize.

Shame

corporates are so weird ... even apple ... yes mom, that WAS me stealing the cookies, always said AFTER being caught

gregorylent on allthingsd.com

Bad fruit! Should've gone for a sweet dessert instead... The one that outlines the permissions before accepting to download. Now go and invent this!

albundles on endgadget.com

They are such a leader on the privacy front. Way to go Apple (Sarcasm for you Apple fanboys)

Peter Mullen on allthingsd.com

Oh yeah?

Getting ever closer to Android's permission-based app model. . .

Gatorguy on appleinsider.com

"Apple copies Android". Pot, meet kettle. Kettle, pot.

Rene Fournier on allthingsd.com

Who's naive here? Go check what google is doing in search with things like Goggle SPYW, then get back here talking about privacy.

Camillo Miller on allthingsd.com

Relax

The app developers were exploiting this, not Apple. Apple has listened to it's users and is changing the requirements of app developers. Case closed.

BongBong on allthingsd.com

See? Problem solved simply enough.

thataveragejoe on appleinsider.com

At least they fixed it instead of going around the issue or saying why it's a good thing.

dude2k5 on endgadget.com

And so the violated privacy uproars settles down. Until the next time.

Top 10 Hot Internet of Things Startups
Join the discussion
Be the first to comment on this article. Our Commenting Policies