Is the Samsung Galaxy Mega phone too darn big?

Image Courtesy of Tech Hive

Today in Open Source: The Samsung Galaxa Mega is huge! Plus: Aging Linux developers, and an overview of Linux bootloaders

Is the Samsung Galaxy Mega Android Phone Too Big?

Tech Hive has a full review of the Samsung Galaxy Mega Android phone. Wow, this sucker is one big phone! The screen is 6.3 inches, and it's doubtful that most people could get this thing to fit in their pockets.

At 6.59 by 3.46 by 0.31 inches, the Galaxy Mega is bigger than both the LG Optimus G Pro and Samsung’s own Galaxy Note II. If you wear skinny jeans, or anything smaller than giant man pants, you will struggle to get the Mega fully inside your pocket. And if you have small fingers, as I do, you’ll find yourself constantly cradling the Mega with both hands so that it doesn’t slip out. This isn’t a phone that you can hold discreetly, or comfortably use one-handed. Dialing a number or replying to a text message with just your thumb is a challenge, and in my tests I often hit a button I didn’t mean to.

More at Tech Hive

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Image Courtesy of Tech Hive

I wrote a column here on ITworld a while back asking if Android phones were too large. Well, I think the answer is yes as far as the Samsung Galaxy Mega goes! Who in their right mind would want to walk around with a phone that big?

Okay, I can totally understand someone carrying a 7 inch tablet if they really need tablet functionality, but a phone? It seems to me that toting it around is more work than it's worth. I can't imagine holding the Mega up to your ear to have a phone conversation, you'd look quite ridiculous if you did so.

I can understand Samsung wanting to offer various sizes of phones, that probably makes sense in terms of its customer base. But at some point bigger is not always better. It just becomes completely silly if taken too far.

I think it's fair to say that Samsung jumped the shark with the Galaxy Mega.

What's your take on this? Would you buy the Samsung Galaxy Mega? Tell me in the comments.

Are Linux Developers Getting Too Old?

SJVN has an interesting article about the age of Linux developers. Linux development is going gray, and it seems like the younger generations might not be as interested in participating as their older counterparts.

It's not that Linux's core developers are "old." After all, Linus Torvalds, Mr. Linux himself, is only 42. But for a few years now, the core Linux kernel developers have been aware that the top programmers have been getting older.

Tux-220

This isn't just an impression. While as Amanda McPherson, The Linux Foundation's VP of marketing and developer programs, told me that "participation in Linux is greater than ever before" and that "more than 8,000 people had contributed to the Linux kernel since 2005," a closer look at the Linux developer numbers reveals that the older generations of Linux programmers are fading away.

More at ZDNet

Steven is relatively upbeat about the Linux Foundation's efforts to bring in new blood to Linux development, and I hope he's right. Linus and company cannot go on forever. Linux himself is 42, so he's no spring chicken.

I wonder why the younger folks aren't taking to Linux development as much as the older generations? Could it be that they've become spoiled by the riches heaped on them by older developers? I'm not sure, but there definitely seems to be some passion lacking in some of the younger people.

Or maybe I'm just getting old and crotchety myself? I'm 44, so I'm even older than Linus! If you're a younger developer, please let me know if you've done some Linux development in the comments below. I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts about the need for new blood among Linux developers.

Linux Bootloaders

Devyn Johnson has a brief overview of Linux bootloaders at Linux.org that some of you might find interesting.

Linux has a few bootloaders to choose from. Usually, Linux administrators leave the distro's default bootloader installed. Sometimes administrators need to use a different one or the distro's installer gives the administrators a choice between bootloaders. Clearly, it helps to know about the different Linux bootloaders.

More at Linux.org

Bootloaders aren't exactly sexy, they don't usually get a lot of press. But Devyn's post in the forum might be useful to those who don't know what a bootloader is, and which ones are which.

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