Should Microsoft open source Windows XP?

In today's open source roundup: Should Windows XP be made open source by Microsoft? Plus: China might replace Windows XP with Linux, and a review of Samsung's Galaxy S5

The end of support for Windows XP has left some users stranded with no security updates from Microsoft. Should the Redmond giant open source Windows XP? Forbes takes a look at this possibility and explores the issues associated with it.

According to Forbes:

If the source code for Windows XP were open source, independent security researchers and developers would be able to proactively analyze it to find and fix flaws rather than waiting for discovered vulnerabilities to be patched by Microsoft. If Microsoft were to sponsor or coordinate that effort—or even just cooperate—the open source community could be given early access to vulnerability data so that patches could be developed for XP in parallel with the supported operating systems, and released simultaneously along with the monthly Patch Tuesday security bulletins.

More at Forbes

I'm inclined to agree with the conclusion of the article at Forbes. At this point it just doesn't make sense to wait around to see if Microsoft will ever open source Windows XP. There are so many different Linux distributions available to replace it. Plus, it's very doubtful that Microsoft would ever do such a thing anyway. It's just not in their DNA to open source Windows, even an old and outdated version of it.

China and Windows XP

Speaking of Windows XP, China is taking a look at Linux as an alternative.

According to Softpedia:

Microsoft's decision to stop issuing security updates for Windows XP has determined the Chinese authorities to start looking for answers, and it seems that Linux might be the solution. Windows XP still occupies a large portion of the market, with a little over 50%, so it's understandable why they might consider that it's time for a change.

According to a report made by news.xinhuanet.com, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology is looking to provide the needed support for an operating system that is ready to replace Windows XP.

More at Softpedia
China Replace Windows XP With Linux
Image credit: Softpedia

It's great that China is considering Linux, but what on earth has taken them so long to do it? It seems to me they should have settled this question years ago, and then already had a solution in place. I guess I'll never understand why some folks have allowed themselves to be stuck scrambling for a Windows XP replacement after Microsoft has ended support for it.

Samsung Galaxy S5 review

VentureBeat has a full review of Samsung's Galaxy S5 phone.

According to Venture Beat:

Mostly, the Galaxy S5 shows that Samsung has learned from its (many) past mistakes. It’s a sign that Samsung might actually be able to innovate in future products rather than just follow industry leaders. By taking a step back, Samsung has crafted one of the best Android phones today. And perhaps most surprisingly, it’s a Galaxy phone I’d actually want to use.

After testing both the Galaxy S5 and HTC’s new One, I was surprised to find myself enjoying Samsung’s device a lot more. The Galaxy S5 can survive any spill, it has a killer camera, and most importantly, it’s a joy to use. It’s the first Galaxy phone I would recommend to anyone without hesitation.

More at Venture Beat
Samsung Galaxy S5 review
Image credit: Venture Beat

Venture Beat seemed quite positive in their take on the Samsung Galaxy S5. I always like to see what existing customers are saying though, so I took a peek at the user reviews on Amazon for the Galaxy S5. So far it has an overall rating of four stars and most purchasers seem to like it a lot, so Venture Beat's review seems mostly on target.

What's your take on all this? Tell me in the comments below.

The opinions expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the views of ITworld.

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