Ill-informed haters go after MongoDB

NoSQL databases like MongoDB are great for some tasks but not for others. Is it MongoDB's fault if misguided developers use it to solve the wrong problem?

By Andrew Oliver, InfoWorld |  Big Data, databases, MongoDB

Something also tells me that you don't have a particularly good use case for a document database or the kinds of traffic that makes these decisions "have to's" instead of "because I read a blog on it." In short, "MongoDB doesn't run on my netbook" doesn't mean that it sucks.

Anonymous says...Much of the recent anti-buzz sounds like the same stuff from about a year ago when some dude who courageously posted anonymously on pastebin said:

Our team did serious load on MongoDB on a large (10s of millions of users, high profile company) userbase, expecting, from early good experiences, that the long-term scalability benefits touted by 10gen would pan out. We were wrong, and this rant serves to deter you from believing those benefits and making the same mistake we did. If one person avoids the trap, it will have been worth writing. Hopefully, many more do.

What follows is a scathing indictment of MongoDB. However, the CTO of 10gen refuted it all -- and shortly afterward, the poster confessed he was a troll spreading misinformation.

The right tool for the jobLast week I gave a talk at CouchConf in San Francisco. It was basically a 40-minute live version of my "Which freaking database should I use?" article introducing people to the NoSQL landscape. I was afraid it would be lightly attended, since I assumed everyone at a conference on CouchBase (also a document database) would be familiar with the different types of databases and their use cases. But the talk was not only well attended, lots of folks were there taking notes and pictures. My concern is that a number of people are trying NoSQL databases and reaching disillusionment without either understanding the proper use case for the type of database they are choosing or without the help they need in changing their development paradigm.

As David Mytton said on the Server Density blog, "What we're really seeing is the hype cycle in action rather than everyone hating MongoDB." Also, as the pastebin troll revealed:

My intention was to troll as many hipsters as possible and make them a little more aware of how easy to manipulate they are, without even providing the slightest bit of evidence. It cracks me up that there are startups out there right now, making foolish architecture decisions based on the FUD I'm spreading. Start thinking for yourself!


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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