Lessons for CIOs: Skewed data and dirty politics

IT executive management lessons from Libyan proto-dictator

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The team, led by the head of MI6 during the first Gulf War and an agent who was instrumental in getting Libya to make peace with the West, interviewed heads of NGOs such as as the World Trade Organization and the International Monetary Fund, to get their views on the dynamics of autocratic rule.

Dr. Gaddafi's conclusion was that even under autocratic regimes, giving legitimate voice to citizens and business organizations as well as the government would result in more stable, more democratic societies.

The documentation Monitor Group delivered provided credible evidence for Dr. Gaddafi's 428-page thesis as did, presumably, his decision to continue funding the study program at LSE under which he received his degree.

The key skills identified here are:

1. The ability to delegate;

2. The ability to outsource information-gathering to a credible source;

3. Chutzpah.

Dr. Gaddafi received his Ph.D. in 2007 and has managed to find work in Libya. The London School of Economics announced today it would close the study program he funded.

Gaddafi's latest project is the defense of Tripoli from citizens rebelling against his father's rule, an effort in which he may have been wounded, and about which he was quoted as saying:

"They [the protesters] have started by attacking army camps, have killed soldiers, officers ... and taken weapons... We will keep fighting until the last man standing...We will eradicate them all."

Key lessons:

1. Get the evidence you need to make the case you need to make at the time;

2. Don't let a case you've already made restrict your ability to shoot anyone who unhappy with your previous work.

Kevin Fogarty writes about enterprise IT for ITworld. Follow him on Twitter @KevinFogarty.

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