NYSE Turns to Appliances In BI Consolidation Effort

By Eric Lai, Computerworld |  Business Intelligence, data warehouse, NYSE

NYSE Euronext Inc., which operates the New York Stock Exchange, Euronext and other stock markets, has turned to data warehousing appliances from Greenplum Inc. and Netezza Corp. as it consolidates its business intelligence systems.

Steven Hirsch, senior vice president and chief data officer at NYSE Euronext, said that the appliances from Greenplum and Netezza have significantly accelerated analysis of the company's internal business and performance data.

The New York-based stock exchange operator's previous BI infrastructure consisted of Oracle data warehouses paired with BI servers running analysis software from SAS Institute Inc. , Hirsch said. Having separate servers for data warehousing and BI "doesn't work when you are processing terabytes of data per day," he added. He declined to disclose the cost of the appliances.

The "long process of consolidating" the multiple BI tools used at NYSE Euronext, created in 2007 with the merger of NYSE Group Inc. and Euronext NV, is continuing, Hirsch said. "From SAS to Business Objects to Brio, we've got pretty much everything that's been released in the last five to 10 years," he noted.

The need to consolidate BI tools is widespread, according to the results of a Forrester Research Inc. survey of 82 CIOs and IT managers that was released late last month. More than 40% of respondents said that their firms are using three to five different BI analysis and reporting tools. More than one out of five are running six or more tools, the survey found.

Hirsch said that NYSE Euronext has been using the Greenplum 4500 appliance for about nine months to store and analyze data that can help managers determine the causes of slowdowns during the process of taking, executing and acknowledging trades for stocks, bonds and other securities.

The Netezza appliances have been used a bit longer to track and audit trades and orders, Hirsch said. Both vendors' appliances have so far kept up with the "pretty sophisticated types of analytics" required by stock exchanges, he added.

Hirsch said he also evaluated appliances from Datallegro (now part of Microsoft), ParAccel, Aster Data Systems and Teradata.

This version of the story originally appeared in Computerworld 's print edition.

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