FBI details most difficult Internet scams

By Michael Cooney, Network World |  Business, FBI, internet security

Online scams continue to be the scourge of the Internet and there seems to be no end to the “imagination” of these criminals. As part of its annual wide-ranging look at Internet crime, the Federal Bureau of Investigation took a look at the top Internet scams of 2009.

“The figures contained in [the FBI's] report indicate that criminals are continuing to take full advantage of the anonymity afforded them by the Internet. They are also developing increasingly sophisticated means of defrauding unsuspecting consumers. Internet crime is evolving in ways we couldn’t have imagined just five years ago,” said National White Collar Crime Center Director Donald Brackman in the report. Annual crime complaints reported to Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) have increased 667.8% between 2001 and 2009.

FBI: Internet fraud losses more than doubled in 2009

According to the FBI and the IC3 Web site, the “popular scam trends for 2009” included hitman scams, astrological reading frauds, economic scams, job site scams, and fake pop-up ads for antivirus software.

From the report, here’s a look at the top Internet scams of 2009:

Fake Pop-up Ads for Anti-Virus Software

One of the truly nasty scams involves pop-up ads for rogue anti-virus software. Victims reportedly receive ads warning them of the existence of threatening viruses and/or illegal content allegedly found on the victim’s computer. When victims click on the fake pop-ups, malicious code is downloaded. Victims are directed to purchase anti-virus software to repair their computers, but in some instances this resulted in viruses, Trojans, or key loggers downloaded onto their computers. Attempts to contact the anti-virus software companies were unsuccessful. The IC3 says that users who see these unexpected antivirus pop-up warnings should shut down their browsers or their computers immediately and then run an antivirus scan to see what's going on. The FBI says these scammers have made more than $150 million in the past year.

Hitman


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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