Gen Y vs. Gen X: Who causes more IT headaches?

By , CIO |  IT Management, BYOD, Gen Y

While Gen Y'ers top the list with 44% admitting to installing software on the computer they use for work, Gen X follows close behind at 42%. Following that are Boomers at 36%, according to the study. Additionally, more than 40% of each generation group admit to accessing online services like Google Docs for work purposes.

[ Google Apps: How We Convinced the C-Suite]

-While Gen Y likes their tech better, they're still satisfied with the tech they use for business. The majority of Gen Y'ers are satisfied with the technologies they use to do their jobs (55%) and the technologies their departments use (52%), which is in line with Boomers.

Also interesting to note is the report's finding that Gen Yers are generally more satisfied than their Gen X counterparts across each of these measures.

-Gen Y embraces the IT department. Contrary to what many businesses might think, Gen Y doesn't see IT as a hindrance. Only 8% of Gen Yers believe their IT department is "clueless" and 2% view IT as "significantly hinder[ing]" in getting work done. In fact, almost two-thirds view IT as getting them what they need, or at least attempting to do so.

Because more and more Gen Y'ers are entering into managerial and executive-level positions, they want to-and are able to-help make technology decisions. According to the report, 69% of Gen Yers want input in the technologies that they use most in their jobs. That presents content and collaboration professionals an opportunity to work with them in making tech decisions and setting policies.

For example, Forrester recommends polling not just Gen Y workers but all workers on what tools they need to do their jobs, as well as asking them to evaluate the technologies that the company is considering. This ensures the tools brought in meet the needs of the employees, helping gain employee buy-in, which usually spurs adoption, Keitt says.

Another suggestion for working with rather than against workers is to explore a "bring your own" tech program-with constraints-to allow employees to find tools that work for them.

Because employees have demonstrated a willingness to bring tech into the workplace-such as in the cases of smartphones and tablets-Forrester says that content and collaboration professionals can tap into this trend by extending certain technologies to a larger number of employees. The key to this, however, is setting policies to ensure any devices employees bring in are supported and secure.


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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