Career Watch: IT security loses some of its cachet

By Jamie Eckle, Computerworld |  Career, Careers, IT management

Ask a Premier 100 IT Leader: Jinx Walton

The director of computing services at the University of Pittsburgh answers questions about a colleague's negativity, the job market and leveraging an MBA.

I'm often thrown into projects with a co-worker who is down on everything that our boss and our company does. I've tried to help her channel her anger into positive things that could result in improvements, but she seems to just want to complain. It's wearying to work with her. What can I do? Your attempts to adjust your co-worker's attitude are admirable but obviously futile. It is unfortunate, but some individuals are happiest when they are complaining. Since you now know that she is not going to change, your time is best spent focusing on your tasks and limiting your interactions with her to those necessary to successfully complete projects. To keep her attitude from negatively impacting you, it is important that you distance yourself from her beyond those interactions required for the assigned projects.

I've been out of work for 19 months after eight years as a sysadmin. I'm ready to throw in the towel and find another line of work, except that I love working with technology so much. Any words of encouragement? I really need some. Your experience and love of technology should be key factors in your decision-making process. My recommendation would be that you not limit your search to IT positions that specifically match your background. Eight years as a systems administrator brings with it a wealth of knowledge that is applicable to a variety of technology-based positions. You might want to widen your search and look at all available IT positions and then modify your résumé to show how your experience and expertise apply. By taking the time to modify your résumé for each position, you are focusing attention on your strengths and assisting the employer by demonstrating how your experience fits and brings value to the position.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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