Five signs your IT career is stuck in a rut

By Stacy Collett, Computerworld |  Career, career planning

But don't get too discouraged, Mok says. The problem could be temporary. "A low performance rating is not necessarily an indication of you personally, but relative to the rest of the organization," she explains.

2. You're Not Being Trained or Reskilled, Even in Bad Business Times

Most companies that expect to rebound from difficult times want to keep employees' skills sharp. "If you're not getting trained, reskilled and refreshed, then you're certainly going to be sitting in a rut," or the business may not be expected to survive, says Diane Berry, a Gartner analyst specializing in IT workforce management and retention issues.

In fact, in lieu of pay raises and bonuses, many companies have created career management programs that help assure top performers that they are valued and encourage them to stay.

Some 64% of companies in the Mercer survey said they have increased their focus on career development. If a company is interested in holding on to a talented employee, "they're having conversations about the person's career" or sending emails about career exploration programs to attend, says Van De Voort.

3. You're Doing Two or More Jobs, With no Reward in Sight

If you think you're doing two jobs but aren't being compensated for the extra work, then you may be in a rut, says Sheila Greco, president and CEO of Sheila Greco Associates, a recruiting firm in Amsterdam, N.Y. "I'm OK with people doing one and a half jobs during these down times, but some companies are losing staff and not replacing them," she notes. "You should be compensated in some way." Some of Greco's clients are finding creative ways to reward overextended employees. "They're not giving salary increases, but they're giving them a week's vacation," she says.

4. You're a Telecommuter

If you don't work in the same physical space as your boss, that's probably a sign that your job could be outsourced, Van De Voort says. "Companies are going to keep sending jobs overseas" to take advantage of cheap labor, he says. "So if you're a telecommuter, you're at more risk than if you are in a job where you regularly have face-to-face contact with your boss, colleagues and especially with customers."

5. Your Specialized Skill Earns Less Than It Did 5 Years Ago


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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