iCloud: Syncing

By Alexandra Chang, Macworld |  Cloud Computing, Apple, icloud

Once you have iCloud set up on your devices, you can take advantage of the service's syncing capabilities. You'll be able to access your contacts, calendars, mail, documents, photos, and more across all your devices and on the Web. The syncing process on iCloud, however, is different than the iTunes syncing process Apple users have become familiar with. With iCloud, your data is seamlessly pushed across all of your devices; you won't actively have to choose when you want to sync your device. Instead, your data is automatically stored onto iCloud, and your iOS devices and computers collectively sync to and pull information from this central server on a regular basis, keeping everything up to date.

Basic data sync

Through iCloud, you'll be able to access, update, and sync your email, calendars, and contacts from all of your devices. For instance, if you enter a new contact on your iPhone, it will automatically get pushed to your computer, and vice versa. You can also sync reminders (from iOS 5's new Reminders app), Safari and iBooks bookmarks, and any notes you've made in the Notes app.

Mac users will sync Mail, iCal, and Address Book with the Mail, Calendar, and Contacts apps, respectively; PC users can use Outlook 2007 or later. iOS Reminders are synced with your desktop calendar application by default, while your Notes are stored in your mail application. You can also access all of this information through a Web browser on any computer, just visit and sign into icloud.com. Keep in mind that all of this data counts toward your 5GB storage limit (though you can purchase more space). To choose which items you'd like to sync across your devices, go to Settings -> iCloud and tap the toggles for the appropriate selections.

Documents in the Cloud

Documents in the Cloud allows you to wirelessly work on the same project from multiple devices. This keeps your app information ubiquitous across all of your iOS devices and computers, allowing you to create a document on one device, save it, and pick up where you left off somewhere else. Accessing documents between iOS devices is seamless. Say you started a Numbers spreadsheet on your iPad; you could start entering in information, save that spreadsheet, and open it up later on your iPhone to do some tweaking. Your projects are automatically accessible across your iOS devices, so file sharing or emailing copies to yourself isn't necessary.


Originally published on Macworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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