Files lost in MegaUpload shutdown lead to lawsuits

By , ITworld |  Cloud Computing, FBI, lawsuits

flickr/roland

MegaUpload didn't host 100 percent pirated files. Owners of legit files are calling lawyers.

Even if MegaUpload held 99 percent infringing files, that still leaves many innocent people deprived of their property. What happens next? Lawyers, of course. But the process of suing will be complicated, expensive, and international. Some of the most vocal threats come from other pirate-friendly organizations, leading many to believe this is more PR than legal strategy.

The FBI admits they investigated MegaUpload for two years. The takedown was complete, seizing files that were obviously infringing and obviously legal. Sorting this out will take time, but in two years of preparation, one would think the FBI would have some way to separate infringing from legal files. Looks like that job will be left to a judge, or more likely, a series of judges in multiple countries.

Wrong all around

FBI should just stick with cleaning up crime scenes and leave the internet alone.
Tengfoong Wong on techcrunch.com

the US is way beyond any law at this point, I doubt anything will come of this.
Anonymous on torrentfreak.com

Really?

With a name like Pirate Parties, they're already hurting their own cause.
Mustaqum Mustafa on techcrunch.com

Look up some figures on the value of copyrighted software that people have downloaded for free off megaupload and you might realize why the FBI deems it so important to shut down the site.
no one on torrentfreak.com

They had more then 20 search, seizure and arrest warrants. That easily trumps any property rights by users.
DiamondDNice on gizmodo.com

I just wish they wouldn't call themselves "pirate parties", it seems to be a good way to lose credibility before they even do anything. Why they don't call themselves "internet freedom" parties I'll never know.
guest on torrentfreak.com

Messy

A problem, though, is how much exactly "huge damage" are we talking here. While this act has inevitably or inadvertently created some collateral damage, how much of a dollar figure will it realistically be?
Dave Zan on techcrunch.com

this is as if the DEA came and burnt your house down without any warning because all your neighbors are drug dealers.
gubatron on torrentfreak.com

You'd think that the DOJ would've accounted for this when the invaded another country.
Andrew Dunklee on techcrunch.com

When lawsuits are filed, how long will it take to resolve this case? 2 years? 4 years? 10 years?

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