Calling BS on cloud hype: Prediction that cloud will create 14 million new jobs is misleading

More than half will be overseas; few will be in IT or even in cloud services

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The Asia/Pacific region – primarily China and India – will get the bulk of the new cloud-generated jobs, IDC predicted. Lower labor costs will be a factor, but lower levels of legacy drag, a greater need to build centralized, efficient IT infrastructures and "immense workforce in the region," the report said.

Where will cloud-created jobs appear?

North America
1.17 million jobs
EMEA
2.07 million jobs
Asia/Pacific (other than China)
2.87 million jobs
China/India
6.75 million jobs

Source: IDC

Big winners of cloud era: China, India, every department other than IT

New York alone will account for 2.8 percent of all the cloud-related jobs generated in the U.S., primarily because of the high percentage of financial- and professional-services companies, and higher-than-average levels of spending on private cloud services, IDC predicted.

Los Angeles will be the second-biggest gainer, with .7 percent of new cloud-related jobs, IDC predicted.

There's no firm prediction in this report of what will happen to the overall market for IT jobs.

Gartner, Forrester and other analyst companies have covered that territory before, however, usually stepping carefully to avoid making the news too bad for the technology managers who buy analyst reports to figure out whether they'll have a job in five years.

Probably, according to Golden, Dines, Gartner's Chris Wolf and other analysts, there will be plenty of IT jobs in five years.

They won't be the same jobs, won't be in the same companies and won't have anything like the same career paths or, in some cases, potential to make a decent living.

Automating complex processes within a business makes everything more efficient; it does nothing to help the people who build the automation systems from losing their jobs when the process is finished.

That's one reason IT departments are more cautious about large-scale cloud migrations than they might be otherwise, according to most analysts.

The cloud offers a bright picture to most of the business; for IT, the cloud comes not with a silver lining, but an overwhelming sense of foreboding.

"Asking an infrastructure and operations (I&O) person what he or she thinks of public cloud computing is like asking a turkey what it thinks of Thanksgiving," Golden wrote.

Photo Credit: 

IDC

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