Master MySQL in the Amazon cloud

Amazon Web Services offer new challenges and flexibility for database admins -- here's how to avoid the pitfalls and tune for performance

By Sean Hull, InfoWorld |  Cloud Computing, Amazon Web Services, MySQL

In either case, you'll want a last-ditch insurance policy for restoring your application. Scripting can vary depending on the complexity of your environment. For just a couple of servers, you can build your image as you like it, then snapshot and use that as your gold-standard server. When the instance spins up, a user data script is called, which you can supply to fulfill last steps or additional configuration needs.

For more complex environments, Scalr or Rightscale can provide a templating solution for your automation needs. For even more sophisticated environments or for operations teams ready to embrace configuration management to the fullest, Chef and Puppet may be options for you. With your automation scripts built, you can deploy a new server either in Amazon or another cloud provider, then deploy your code and configurations. As a final step you'll want to restore your data; with an offsite backup, you'll have that base covered.

Cache aggressivelyCaching is crucial in the cloud, and you can ensure high performance through four modes of caching: caching in the browser, caching objects, caching queries, and caching data.

Caching in the browser: All items in a page that the browser fetches can be cached. This includes images, HTML objects, code, and so forth. Although many browsers are configured to perform a lot of caching by default, this is often not sufficient. That's because Web pages are returned to the browser with a cache-control setting that is primarily commanded and configured by the Web server itself. This is good news for the operations team, as it is another switch or dial that can be turned to speed things up.

Typically, cache control should be set with a maximum age of one week. This becomes the default for objects sent to the browser. They can still be expired manually in code and application logic as necessary.

Caching objects: Object caches are a great addition to the caching layer at the Web server tier. Application code such as PHP or Ruby include libraries for making use of memcache, a popular object cache that handles name and value pairs. Whenever data is requested from the database, the object cache is checked first. If it is available, the data will be returned as much as 100 times faster -- no network round trip to the database box, no complex database queries or caching.

If the data is not available in the object cache, a cache miss happens, and a request to the database will follow. The results returned will then be placed in the object cache for future use.


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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