Cloud startup gets cues from Amazon, Google and OpenStack to drive private cloud

By Brandon Butler, Network World |  Cloud Computing, OpenStack

OpenStack startup Cloudscaling says that for true interoperability in a hybrid cloud, it's not enough to just have API compatibility between your private and public cloud. It really helps for the fundamental architecture of the two to be analogous.

Cloudscaling has been on a journey in the past few years, evolving from a cloud consultancy that built cloud platforms for companies like KT (Korea Telecom), then used that experience to launch a cloud platform based on OpenStack code. The company released the second version of its product, Open Cloud System (OCS) 2.0, this week at the OpenStack Summit.

The move represents the growing community of companies releasing cloud products and services based on the OpenStack code. Linux distribution companies Canonical, SUSE and Red Hat have been some of the earliest, while a startup like Piston Cloud Computing Co. has been born out of the OpenStack movement. Cisco even threw its hat in the ring, releasing a recommended configuration of OpenStack projects it is calling the Cisco OpenStack edition.

But Cloudscaling says it is different. Other distribution companies have what Cloudscaling CEO Michael Grant calls "raw OpenStack"; they're distributing OpenStack code with some additional features. Cloudscaling claims to use OpenStack code as a basis for its cloud platform and added on top of it services that make it "enterprise grade." While not the first company to claim this, Cloudscaling says it's taking into account performance and quality of service guarantees, building in redundancy, resiliency, fault tolerance, graceful degradation and scale-out features, while allowing for interoperability with public clouds from Amazon Web Services and Google. "Once your cloud is in production, it can't be a science project anymore," Grant says.

HOW TO GO HYRBID: SDN and virtual networking seen as a key to growing hybrid clouds


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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