10 of the most useful cloud databases

By Brandon Butler, Network World |  Cloud Computing, Amazon Web Services, databases

Amazon Web Services has a variety of cloud-based database services, including both relational and NoSQL databases. Amazon Relational Database (RDS) run either MySQL, Oracle or SQL Server instances, while Amazon SimpleDB is a schema-less database meant for smaller workloads. On the NoSQL side, Amazon DynamoDB is its solid-state drive (SSD)-backed database that automatically replicates workloads across at least three availability zones. AWS CTO Werner Vogels says DynamoDB is AWS's fastest growing service in AWS history. Amazon also offers a variety of auxiliary data management services, such as its newly announced data warehouse named Redshift, as well as Data Pipeline, which helps users integrate data from multiple sources for easier management.

More information: Amazon Web Services' databases

EnterpriseDB

EnterpriseDB focuses on the open source PostgreSQL databases, but its real claim to fame is its ability to work with Oracle database applications. With EnterpriseDB's Postgres Plus Advanced Server, organizations can use applications written for on-premise Oracle databases through EnterpriseDB, which runs in clouds from Amazon Web Services and HP. It has binary replication and scheduled backups as well.

More information: EnterpriseDB

Garantia Data

Garantia offers a gateway service for users to run open source Redis and Memcached in-memory NoSQL databases services in AWS's public cloud. Using Garantia's software allows for automatic configuration of these open source data platforms by helping developers scale nodes, create clusters and architect for fault tolerance.

More information: Garantia Data

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Google Cloud SQL

Google's cloud database service is centered on two major products: Google Cloud SQL, which Google describes as a MySQL-like fully relational database infrastructure, and Google BigQuery, an analysis tool for running queries on large data sets stored in its cloud.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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