Explaining the Kim Dotcom/Megaupload case

Confused about all the fuss around Kim Dotcom and Megaupload? Wondering what it’s all about? Let us explain it so even mom will understand

By  


Kim Dotcom launches Mega. What could go wrong?

REUTERS/Nigel Marple

Assuming he doesn’t go to prison, what’s next for Mr. Dotbomb?

Dotcom, mom. I’m not sure, although, this week, on the one year anniversary of his arrest, he launched a new file-sharing site, named Mega.

Is he allowed to do that and couldn’t he come up with a more original name?

Probably not, since he promised to not take part in a file sharing business as part of his bail agreement. However, he claims he can since it’s a new business which now encrypts the data before it’s stored on Mega’s servers so they have no way knowing if copyrighted material is being shared.

Are people using it?

So far, yes, at least 500,000 users have registered with the site, although their servers are having trouble keeping up with the load. Also, Gabon won’t let them use the me.ga domain.

Good for the Gabonese, er Gabonites! I think I saw that place on House Hunters International once. Well, this new services sounds awfully similar to the business that got Mr Dotcloud in trouble in the first place, Megauptown.

Mom, for the last time, his name is Dotcom and the business was Megaupload. Why don’t we just leave it at that for now? I’ll let you know when there’s more news on this.

Please do - and do you think I could download a copy of The Graduate from this new Mega site? That young Dustin Hoffman was the bombdiggity.

Maybe, mom. I gotta go.

  Sign me up for ITworld's FREE daily newsletter!
Email: 
 

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Cloud ComputingWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness