Docs prescribe iPad Mini - a perfect lab coat fit

Doctors glad that iPad Mini sticks with same interface as its bigger brother

By , Computerworld |  Consumerization of IT, Apple, ipad

One in three physicians plannned to buy the iPad Mini even when its existence was just a rumor, according to a poll of doctors by medical app developer Epocrates.

According to 90% of respondents to the survey, the smaller size of the iPad Mini is their main motivation. The 50 physicians surveyed indicated the iPad Mini will be easier to tote around between exam rooms and on hospital rounds because it fits nicely into the pockets of their lab coats.

Lab coat pockets are 8.5-in. high and 7.5-in. wide. The iPad Mini is 7.87-in. high and 5.3-in. wide.

The use of tablets by physicians for professional purposes almost doubled since 2011, reaching 62% this year, with the iPad as the dominant device. Half of tablet-owning physicians have used their devices at the point of care, according to a study by market research and advisory firm Manhattan Research.

The original iPad offered a lighter, less expensive alternative to the purpose-built tablets that medical personnel had been using, according to IHS iSuppli, a market research firm. The first-generation iPad was popular with physicians even though it lacked a critical feature -- an external camera -- that they very much wanted. The iPad 2 and later model provided the camera, which the medical staff uses to aid in patient care, such as photographing wounds in order to keep a visual record during treatment.

A survey of 3,798 physicians conducted in May last year by QuantiaMD, a mobile and online community of 125,000 physicians, found that access to electronic medical record (EMR) data tops the physician wish-list for how they want to use mobile technology.

More than 80% of physicians responding to QuantiaMD's survey indicated they own a mobile device capable of downloading applications, an adoption rate for smartphones and tablets significantly higher than that of the U.S. population.

Apple products are the clear preference of physicians, according to QuantiaMD's survey. Of the mobile devices purchased by physicians for their private practices, the figures were: iPhone, 59%; iPad, 28%; Android smartphone, 21%; Android tablet, 3%; and Blackberry, 11%. For tablet users, the iPad was virtually alone, with only a fraction of physicians using Android tablets, the survey showed. For physicians who don't own mobile devices, the survey found that 66% are likely to select Apple products.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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