Data center energy usage gets closer inspection with new software

Romonet updates SaaS performance and lifecycle tools

By Sam Shead, Techworld |  Data Center, data center energy use

Romonet has introduced a new version of its SaaS-based data centre performance and lifecycle management software to help data centre managers detect cash-burning technologies and get more computations for their watts.

Data centre operators have invested heavily in metering, but they often don't know how much energy they should be using, according to Romonet.

Romonet's Portal 2.0 aims to predict, control and analyse the performance and total cost of ownership (TCO) of a data centre portfolio.

The company claims that its software can see what's happening down to the individual metre of the facility so data centre operators can monitor what's happening where, and whether everything's working as it should be.

"With Portal 2.0 deployed on top of a data centre infrastructure management (DCIM)/metering solution operational teams can now see an 'expected' value against each sub-meter," said Romonet CEO Zahl Limbuwala. "Ultimately this allows operators to quickly spot divergences in performance anywhere in the system and stop potentially service disrupting issues before they occur."

Romonet claims it can model any running data centre in less than five days and have them up and running with Portal 2.0 in less than two weeks.

Ovum principal analyst Roy Illsley told Techworld that he expected uptake of Portal 2.0 to be low at first because many data centre managers still don't consider energy consumption to be an issue, in part because IT does not pay the energy bill.

However, he believes that the technology will become increasingly popular over the next five years as mindsets change and data centre managers realise that measuring energy consumption is an increasingly important part of their job.

"The CEO asking what it costs to deliver service X internally to externally and what the risks are so they can make strategic decisions will become more common place," said Illsley.

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Originally published on Techworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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