Apple iPhone 5 less toxic than Samsung Galaxy S III

Study conducted by iFixit and Ecology Center places original iPhone as the most toxic smartphone among 36 evaluated

By , IDG News Service |  Data Center

The battle between Apple's iPhone 5 and Samsung's Galaxy S III rages on -- a study conducted by the disassembly firm iFixit and nonprofit organization Ecology Center has concluded that the iPhone 5 is less toxic than the Galaxy S III smartphone.

The study, which sought out the levels of hazardous chemical contents in smartphones, placed the iPhone 5 at the fifth spot with a 2.8 score out of an overall rating of 5, and the Galaxy S III in the ninth spot with a rating of 3.0. Both phones were topped by Motorola's Citrus, which took the top spot, followed by LG's Remarq, the iPhone 4S and Samsung Captivate.

The study's goal was to identify the environmental friendliness of smartphones, and to check the levels of hazardous substances that could be potentially damaging to the environment and human health. IFixit and Ecology Center disassembled 36 mobile phones released in the last 5 years, and tested for 35 substances including chlorine, mercury, lead, arsenic, chromium, cobalt, copper, nickel and cadmium. Tests were conducted on cases, processors, buttons, circuit boards, screens and other hardware. Results of the study are available on Ecology Center's HealthyStuff.org website.

The new iPhone 5 is a big improvement over the original iPhone, which was released in 2007 and has been rated the most toxic in the study. Also among the most toxic phones are the Nokia N95, which also shipped in 2007, and Research In Motion's BlackBerry Storm 9530, which shipped in 2008.

Every phone contained at least lead, bromine, chlorine, mercury and cadmium, according to the study. The Samsung Galaxy S III and iPhone 5 had some levels of lead and mercury contents.

The study was based on 1,100 samples of smartphones, with three for each brand, said Jeff Gearhart, research director at Ecology Center.

The goal was to point out the environmental friendliness of the smartphones, Gearhart said. The effects of hazardous materials could linger for years, and a wide range of contaminants could show up in air or soil years after smartphones are discarded.

It is critically important that smartphones are properly recycled to limit the effects of hazardous materials, Gearhart said. Smartphones tend to be chemically intensive, but the mobile industry is making great progress in reducing hazardous chemicals.

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