Why Google Maps for iPhone is good for Apple

By Lex Friedman, Macworld |  Software, Apple, Google

Despite its aesthetic achievements, Apple's Maps app in iOS 6 left a lot of users unhappy. Turns out that the years Google spent building out its mapping data were hugely important; Apple's data--which powered its new Maps app--didn't have the real world, real user testing that Google Maps benefited from. That's why Apple CEO Tim Cook apologized to customers over his company's Maps app. And that's why customers are now so excited about Google's new, free mapping app for iPhone. And you know who else is excited about Google's new app? Apple.

Why abandon Google?

Apple hasn't commented on the record about exactly why it chose to sever its relationship with Google for the Maps app in iOS 6. The most public explanation the company offered came in Cook's public apology letter, when he wrote "We wanted to provide our customers with even better Maps including features such as turn-by-turn directions, voice integration, Flyover and vector-based maps. In order to do this, we had to create a new version of Maps from the ground up."

The implication there--and the rumor mill's conclusion--is that Google wouldn't allow Apple to offer features like turn-by-turn navigation with voice assist or vector-based map imagery, at least not without substantially hiking licensing fees. Some have also suggested that Google wanted to insert ads into the Maps app, and that Apple wouldn't allow such promotion within a stock app.

Let's say that's why Apple felt forced to roll its own Maps app solution.

Now, Google's released a free Maps app of its own, which of course leverages Google's own mapping data. And Google's app offers features like--you guessed it--vector-based maps, turn-by-turn directions, and voice assistance. Oh, and at least as of this writing, there are no ads to speak of in Google's apps.

In other words, Apple dropped Google from the official Maps app, because Apple wanted its customers to have access to free (and ad-free) turn-by-turn navigation and vector-based maps. And now, Google--like Apple--is offering iPhone customers exactly that feature set.

This is not a big problem for Apple.

What Apple loses if you use Google Maps

If a substantial percentage of iPhone customers turn to Google's free alternative to the built-in iOS Maps app, what does Apple lose? Not much.


Originally published on Macworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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