7 programming languages on the rise

From Ruby to Erlang, once niche programming language are gaining converts in today’s enterprise

By Peter Wayner, InfoWorld |  Development, cobol, CUDA extensions

MathWorks, the company behind Matlab, offers a diverse set of whitepapers showing how engineers are searching for statistical answers. Toyota Racing, for instance, plans its NASCAR entries by analyzing tests in wind tunnels and other labs. Canada's Institute for Biodiagnostics is searching for the best treatment for burns.

There are also a number of open source alternatives, including Octave, Scilab, Sage, and PySci, one of the aforementioned Python libraries. All of these tools help with the complicated statistical analysis that is now becoming common for firms trying to understand what the customer did and what the customer may want to do in the future.

Programming languages on the rise: JavaScript JavaScript is not an obscure language by any means. If anything, it may be the most compiled language on Earth, if only because every browser downloads the code and recompiles it every time someone loads a Web page. Despite this fact and the increasing dominance of AJAX-savvy Web pages, JavaScript is rarely thought of as a language that runs on the big iron.

This isn't for lack of trying. Netscape tried to make JavaScript the common language on its server platform back in 1996, but ended up establishing it only in the browser. Aptana, one of the latest devotees, throttled its development of Jaxer when it never caught on. AppJet, a small experimental company, used the Rhino JavaScript library written in Java to make it simpler to code server-side. That company was acquired by Google in 2009 and now seems to be devoted to other projects.

Still, new applications for JavaScript abound. CouchDB, for instance, doesn't use SQL for queries, instead taking two JavaScript functions, one for selection (Map) and the other for bundling everything together (Reduce). Node.js is one of the more exciting server-side JavaScript frameworks to appear as of late, revitalizing the ancient dream of bringing harmony to both client and server-side programming. The package takes Google's V8 JavaScript engine created for the browser and lets it make the decisions about formatting outgoing data.


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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