Microsoft Visual Studio upgrade focuses on agile development

Visual Studio vNext also links development and operations staff

By , InfoWorld |  Software, agile development, Microsoft

With the next version of its Visual Studio software development environment, dubbed Visual Studio vNext, Microsoft will emphasize agile programming practices as well as linkages between development and operations units.

Detailed this week, the agile and collaboration endeavors comprise Microsoft's application lifecycle vision for vNext. "When we asked people what the biggest problem they faced in successfully delivering software, they identified the need for better collaboration.We know that building software takes a team of people including developers, testers, architects, project planners, and more," said Jason Zander, Microsoft corporate vice president, in a blog post.

[ The critical "Manifesto for Agile Software Development " document recently turned 10 years old. | Keep up with the latest developer news with InfoWorld's Developer World newsletter. | Follow Paul Krill on Twitter. ]

Agile planning tools in vNext are intended to enable transparency across the planning process and full team participation through solutions like a new backlog and task board. Agile quality assurance capabilities include code review support, enhanced unit testing frameworks, and exploratory testing. A lightweight requirements capability in the product provides a way to receive feedback on requirements early in the process. Stakeholder feedback is intended to ensure that working code matches expectations. The vNext release will feature a Web-based interface that implements the scrum model of agile programming. No timeframe has been revealed yet for the release of vNext.

"Visual Studio vNext provides a natural way to work through stakeholder feedback using something we are all familiar with, PowerPoint. Using the Storyboarding plug-in for PowerPoint, the product owner can quickly mock up the solution and get feedback," Zander said.

Microsoft's vNext plan brings needed integration between development and operations personnel, said analyst Al Hilwa, of IDC. "What I think is important here is that Microsoft can bring these capabilities to the masses in a broader way than other vendors typically can," Hilwa said.


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question