Perfect gift for developers: Caffeine you can inhale instead of drink

Big problem with Pizza Method: Too hard to fit Mt. Dew bottles under the door

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For years the (theoretically) most successful process to produce custom-designed corporate software was the "Pizza Method."

You lock your developers in a room, lock it behind then and keep shoving pizza under the door until the code is finished.

It's an old joke that's missing one vital component: caffeine.

Developers depend more on on Red Bull, Mountain Dew Red, double-espresso-shot macchiatos and anything else with caffeine than they do even on pizza.

All that liquid is problematic, though. Coffee and soda are harder to squeeze under a door than pizza, for one thing. And unless there's a bathroom in your developer's suite the one paying for the pizza won't be the only one complaining when the project is finished.

Luckily there is a solution that is not only compact enough to fit under a door, it could be piped in through the air conditioning vents.

AeroShot Pure Energy is an inhaler that puffs out 100mg of caffeine – about the same as in a cup of coffee – contained in a fine powder users can inhale easily with no ill effects, according to the creators.

AeroShot – which I'm only about half convinced is not a practical joke making fun of either idiotic product development or the drive to put caffeine in everything from bottled water to soap – is the invention of a Harvard engineering professor whose self promotion paints him as at least as much artist as scientist.

David Edwards is a chaired professor of biomedical engineering at Harvard, a chemical engineer by training and energetic advocate of combining biological and artificial systems by avocation.

He is also an explicit advocate and promoter of Creativity as founder of the ArtScience Labs (which "catalyze idea translation through art and design experiments at frontiers of science") and author of two books on the role and promotion of creativity in science and among the "Post-Google Generation."

Though the category title sounds unlikely, one of the Breathable Foods is actually the design for almost-nanoparticle-sized whiffle balls into which pharmaceutical makers can insert or attach drug molecules. Having a framework that small could make a wider variety of drugs available as inhalants, which are absorbed into the bloodstream quickly and directly.

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AeroShot

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