Creating mashups: 5 classic mistakes to avoid

By Jeffrey Hanson, ITworld |  Development, book, mashup

This is part of a regular series that highlights new books and their authors. Also in this series: Brian Berenbach on requirements engineering, J. Peter Bruzzese on Exchange Server 2007, Joel Scambray on exposing the hacker's advantage, and Scott Hogg on IPv6 security. (You can find all the installments in this series here.)


Mashup Strategies

The term "mashup" is used in the music industry to define the technique of producing a new song by mixing together two or more existing songs. The term has been adopted by the software development industry to define applications created by mixing user-interface artifacts, processes, and/or content from multiple sources, typically using high-level web scripting programming languages such as HTML, JavaScript, and others.

More than just reassemblies of UI artifacts, mashups are new services, processes, and user interfaces created by integrating existing data, services, processes, and UI artifacts using semantically-rich data formats, dynamic scripting techniques, and well-known patterns.

Bio
Name: Jeffrey Hanson
What I'm working on now: I am currently directing efforts at Max International for building REST-based, service-oriented, and mashup-enabled systems for the retail/wholesale industry.

5 keys for success

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