Adobe brings Flash apps to the iPhone

By , IDG News Service |  Development, Adobe Flash, iPhone

Adobe Systems has come up with a way to let developers write Flash applications for Apple's iPhone and iPod Touch devices, even without the support of Apple.

Adobe has been trying to work with Apple for more than a year to get its Flash Player software running on Apple's products, but has said it needs more cooperation from Apple to get the work done. It has now come up with something of a work-around.

At its Adobe Max developer conference in Los Angeles Monday, Adobe announced that the next release of Flash Professional, due in beta later this year, will allow developers to write applications and compile the code to run on Apple devices.

"We are ecstatic to announce that we're enabling you to use your Flash development tools to build applications and compile them to run natively on the iPhone," said John Loiacono, head of Adobe's Creative Solutions business unit, who made the announcement at Adobe Max.

Adobe noted that it is still not able to offer Flash Player for Apple devices, because Apple's license terms don't allow plug-ins for its Safari browser. "Applications for the iPhone built with Adobe Flash Professional CS5 do not include any runtime interpreted code," the company said in a statement.

However, Flash Professional CS5 will include an option for developers to take the code they wrote for devices that do include Flash Player, compile it to run as a native, stand-alone application on the iPhone, and sell it through Apple's App Store.

Adobe demonstrated a few Flash applications running on an iPhone, including a game called "Chroma Circuit" and Adobe's own Connect Pro conferencing product. More information is at http://www.adobe.com/go/iphone/.

In announcing the move, Adobe executives mocked Apple in a humorous "myth-busting" video segment in which they tried to integrate Flash with the iPhone by mincing the device in a blender with a Flash Player CD and mashing the two products together with a steamroller.

The only two devices they could not get Flash running on, they said in the video, were the iPhone and an old rotary-dial telephone.

Still, the company's ambition remains to get its Flash Player installed on Apple's products. Having Flash programs run natively on a device, outside the browser, will give them some limitations, like being unable to browse Web content, or download SWF files that show how data should be represented.

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