What you lost in FCC's net neutrality ruling

Carriers got the right to throttle; you lost the right to pay more to avoid it

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It would also hurt consumers and businesses who couldn't pay for priority access and restrict innovation by raising costs on Web-based companies that might not have the cash for it either.

So the answer is to allow carriers and ISPs to do what they want and not let content providers or customers pay to get what they want?

How does this differ from a few weeks ago?

Well, before there were no federal rules about this. Now there are. The FCC has spoken.

"Keep everything the way it is, and we'll promise to 'monitor' all the abuses for anti-competitive behavior," the FCC has said. "But take away that last bit of control people might have over their own Internet use. And, by the way, leave the wireless Web completely unregulated so pretty soon people will be so mad about how badly they're being mauled there that they'll forget all about that whole 'net neutrality' thing. "

"Committee adjourned. Let's head over to the carrier holiday party. They bought out the Smithsonian and are giving away exhibits as prizes for 'Pin the Target on the Customer.' Should be a blast."

Kevin Fogarty writes about enterprise IT for ITworld. Follow him on Twitter @KevinFogarty.

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