Critics: U.S. cybersecurity plan has holes, few new items

The U.S. Department of Defense introduced a Strategy for Operating in Cyberspace on Thursday

By , IDG News Service |  Government

In his speech, Lynn revealed that in March, 24,000 files were stolen in a single intrusion at a defense company. He did not reveal more details about the breach but said that generally speaking, while some data that gets stolen is mundane, some involves sensitive systems such as aircraft avionics, surveillance technologies and satellite communications.

The policy is a good first start, said Congressman Jim Langevin, a Democrat from Rhode Island, in a statement. But he pointed out a few issues that still need answers. For example, he'd like to know what are the acceptable "red lines" that justify action in cyberspace. He wonders whether data theft can trigger warfare or if the U.S. would have to wait for a physical event, such as an attack on the country's power grid, before responding militarily.

In May, the DoD said that all options, including physical attacks, are possible in response to a cyber-attack.

Langevin also asked about what resources the DoD will provide to the Department of Homeland Security and private companies for their own defense.

Nancy Gohring covers mobile phones and cloud computing for The IDG News Service. Follow Nancy on Twitter at @idgnancy. Nancy's e-mail address is Nancy_Gohring@idg.com

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