Feds trek to the cloud

By Mary K. Pratt, Computerworld |  Cloud Computing

Moreover, at the time of the survey, only 17% of the federal CIOs were using infrastructure as a service, while 15% were using software as a service and 13% were using platform as a service. However, 20% said they were planning to move to infrastructure as a service, 22% were planning to start using software as a service, and 19% said they had a platform-as-a-service project in the works.

Support for the initiative continues even though Kundra left his CIO post in August to take a fellowship at Harvard University.

"Vivek is the visionary guy, but the next step now is really around policy and governance," says Morgenthal. "These are less visionary and more detail-oriented, so in certain regards, it's good timing, so whoever comes in next can be more structured and eliminate those hurdles."

Glacial Change

Fed IT Leaders Head to the Cloud -- Slowly

More and more federal IT leaders are moving to the cloud, according a survey of 46 CIOs of major federal departments and independent agencies that was conducted by TechAmerica and Grant Thornton LLP. However, the May 2011 survey showed that progress is slow:

57%of the respondents reported that an active move to cloud computing was under way in early 2011, compared with 54% in late 2009.

14% said they are undertaking a cloud pilot, versus 16% in 2009.

None of the CIOs reported that they don't have cloud plans, compared with 8% in late 2009.

Kingsberry says he thinks the government should act faster. "Federal still doesn't move at the pace that it can. There's risk aversion throughout it. And because of that, there isn't going to be this massive move," he says. "But this is a journey, and there are steps. There will be stop points, and right now this is one of the stop points. The next step is for federal as a whole to embrace and understand the performance characteristics for actually making this move."

But Rosen says the move to cloud computing shouldn't be thought of as a race. "My approach is, let's start with something simple, something we can encapsulate, and start with that and then move that into the cloud," he says, noting that IT grew wary of megaprojects for a good reason -- in the past, they often led to big failures. "I'm trying to do [cloud computing] in ways so we don't make mistakes and waste a lot of money, and if we find it doesn't work, we can back out."

Perhaps, then, despite all of the hype around the benefits of cloud computing, the migration of federal IT to the cloud won't be an all-out sprint so much as a well-paced marathon.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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