Tech policy 2012: Comparing the Democrat's and Republican's platforms

By Kenneth Corbin, CIO |  IT Management, cybersecurity, politics

The Republicans vow to conduct an inventory of government spectrum with the goal of implementing new auctions, as the FCC is currently planning for the reallocation of private-sector spectrum, and to focus on public-private partnerships to expand broadband coverage.

The Democratic platform reiterates Obama's goal of delivering high-speed Internet service to 98% of the population, and reaffirms the importance of freeing up new spectrum.

In their address of regulations, the Democrats do not offer an explicit defense of the FCC's net neutrality rule, but instead cite "common-sense safeguards" like the Internet privacy bill of rights the White House has endorsed and the administration's support for do-not-track tools that would give Internet users the chance to opt of online profiling and behavioral targeting.

Perhaps recognizing that the term "net neutrality," or the prohibition against service providers slowing or blocking the transmission of legal content on their networks, has become politically toxic, the Democrats instead endorse the guiding principal.

[Related: Can Online Marketers Be Trusted to Police Privacy Without Feds Oversight]

"President Obama is strongly committed to protecting an open Internet that fosters investment, innovation, creativity, consumer choice, and free speech, unfettered by censorship or undue violations of privacy," the platform reads.

Internet Freedom

Both parties include sections in their platforms addressing Internet freedom, though the Republicans couch theirs in language emphasizing the need to keep the Internet free from overreaching government regulation.

"Its independence is its power," the GOP wrote of the Internet. "The Internet offers a communications system uniquely free from government intervention. We will remove regulatory barriers that protect outdated technologies and business plans from innovation and competition, while preventing legacy regulation from interfering with new and disruptive technologies such as mobile delivery of voice video data as they become crucial components of the Internet ecosystem."


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

IT ManagementWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question