Cyberthieves loot $400,000 from city bank account

Cybertheft comes just days after RSA issued a warning that criminal gang planned massive attacks against U.S. banking customers

By , Computerworld |  Security, cybersecurity

In most incidents, the cybercrooks first stole usernames and passwords used by to gain access to bank accounts. The stolen credentials were then used to log into the online accounts and wire transfer money to mule accounts in the United States and abroad.

The FBI has estimated that U.S. businesses and banks have lost hundreds of millions of dollars due to such thefts in recent years.

The Burlington theft came just days after security firm RSA warned of cybercriminals plotting a massive and concerted campaign to steal money from the online accounts of thousands of consumers at 30 or more major U.S. banks.

In an advisory posted earlier this month, RSA said it had information suggesting that a criminal gang planned to unleash a Trojan program called Gozi Prinimalka that would infiltrate computers belonging to U.S. banking customers and to initiate fraudulent wire transfers from their accounts.

According to RSA, the organizers of the attack are currently recruiting about 100 botmasters to launch and coordinate the attacks.

Since RSA's alert, several other security experts have reported seeing the signs of preparation of an imminent and massive attack against U.S banking customers.

Jaikumar Vijayan covers data security and privacy issues, financial services security and e-voting for Computerworld. Follow Jaikumar on Twitter at @jaivijayan, or subscribe to Jaikumar's RSS feed . His e-mail address is jvijayan@computerworld.com.

Read more about cybercrime and hacking in Computerworld's Cybercrime and Hacking Topic Center.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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