US court renews permission to NSA to collect phone metadata

A disclosure that the government was collecting phone data from customers of Verizon has already generated controversy

By , IDG News Service |  Government

In a letter last week to Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, the U.S. Department of Justice said intelligence tools that NSA uses to identify the existence of potential terrorist communications within the data "require collecting and storing large volumes of the metadata to enable later analysis." If the data is not collected and held by the NSA, the metadata may not continue to be available for the period that it "has deemed necessary for national security purposes" as it need not be retained by telecommunications service providers.

Internet companies like Google, Microsoft and Yahoo have been demanding for greater transparency in the orders of the FISC, after Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor behind the leak of the Verizon order, also disclosed documents that suggested that the NSA has access in real-time to content on their servers. The companies have denied the claims, and want FISC to remove restrictions that prevent them from disclosing requests for customer data under FISA. Yahoo appears to have persuaded FISC to release its secret order and parties' briefs in a 2008 case. The court ordered the government recently to declassify the documents, as it prepares to publish the court's opinion in a redacted form.

John Ribeiro covers outsourcing and general technology breaking news from India for The IDG News Service. Follow John on Twitter at @Johnribeiro. John's e-mail address is john_ribeiro@idg.com

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness