Three 27-in. displays prove bigger is better

If you want to use a single display for both work and entertainment, one of these might suit.

By Bill O'Brien, Computerworld |  Hardware, displays

The display comes with built-in speakers that have better fidelity than the Sceptre's. Even so, you still might want to buy a good speaker setup for your PC to better match the capability of the P2770HD.

I didn't need to do any video adjustments the first time I powered it up. Color, brightness and contrast were spot-on. The Samsung can be adjusted via presets or manually via the remote control.

Image quality with graphics and video was excellent. The colors were vivid, with no streaking or motion blur, but the picture did start to look frosty at about 70 degrees from dead center, more pronounced than with Dell's UltraSharp or Sceptre's X27.

The quality of the image using a Blu-ray disc was quite good.

Bottom line

If you shop around a bit, you can get this monitor for about $400, which isn't bad. Having a monitor and TV in one package -- plus the variety of inputs and a remote control -- makes the P2770HD a great media center candidate.

Sceptre X270W-1080P

These days, finding a 27-inch monitor for $360 -- less if you do some shopping -- isn't such a big deal. The question is how much value do you get for that $360 in the Sceptre X270W-1080P monitor.

Some assembly is required out of the box, but it's only a matter of snapping the base over the post that extends down from the back of the display. There's not a great deal of movement capability: The Sceptre does tilt forward or back slightly, but there's no swivel (unless you move the base from side to side) and no height control. That may leave the monitor a little short if you've placed it on a standard desk (depending on your own height).

The image quality (the monitor has a maximum resolution of 1920 by 1080) was acceptable using the Sceptre's default setting. If you need to change it, you can use the display's on-screen menus, which are accessed using black buttons at the center of the lower black bezel -- with black raised legends telling you what the buttons do. Because it's so difficult to read, you'll need to keep a flashlight and a magnifying glass at the ready for those few times that you do need to access the options.

Display quality can be switched among four options beyond the default standard: Game, Cinema, Scenery and Text. Each varies the color-mix temperature just slightly -- Cinema is hottest and Text is the coolest mode. You can manually adjust the brightness and contrast.

Inputs on the back of the Sceptre are limited to DVI, VGA, HDMI and audio in, which should cover most basic situations. Once you've connected a device to it, you can either manually select which port you're attached to (via the OSD) if you're using multiple PCs or leave it on "auto select" to let the monitor make the choice of the port it should use for a single PC scenario.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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