Riverbed readies cloud, mobility and virtualization rollout

By , Network World |  Hardware, desktop virtualization, WAN optimization

Riverbed has products on tap that will enable WAN optimization as a cloud service, speed up the boot time for remote virtual desktops and, perhaps in a year or two, a software client that will speed up the performance of handhelds and smartphones.

10 tips for boosting network performanceThe company is going to launch a product called Cloud Steelhead late in the fourth quarter of this year, which includes all the features of Riverbed's Steelhead optimization appliances but with features designed for service providers that will make it easier to create services around speeding up transactions over the WAN.

"It has special features that allow it to capture the network traffic for the customer in the public cloud so he can do his acceleration and also some features that service providers like -- the ability to serve multiple customers and have billing data," says Riverbed CEO Jerry Kennelly. "Think of it as a special version of the Virtual Steelhead to be mounted in public cloud providers like Amazon, AT&T -- anyone who is a public cloud provider."

Virtual Steelhead is software introduced last month that can run on VMware virtual machines and includes all the features of a Steelhead appliance.

Kennelly says that the company has traditionally gone after customers who want to speed up connections with data centers and that virtual desktops face some of the same challenges traffic on those links, namely distance that introduces delay and bandwidth restrictions, both of which can be mitigated by optimizing traffic so less bits are sent across the WAN. "We help anyone who's doing desktop virtualization to make a cheaper, more powerful experience for the individual running the desktops, number one," he says. "Number two, we have future products in development that will give you the ability to boot up your servers from across the WAN and have an even more powerful desktop experience.

Some of what is holding Riverbed back is that desktop virtualization itself has been slow to become popular, he says. "The dream is that IT guys would like guys out at the edge with their laptops and desktops to be able to boot that up across the WAN to do continuous protection of their files and essential storage and be able to manage the image of all the desktops in the company in a way that's cheap and efficient," Kennelly says.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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