15 Awesome Things You Probably Shouldn't Do

Want to unlock your iPhone or hack a stranger's Facebook account? It's all possible, but it's also all against the rules.

By , PC World |  Hardware, Facebook, hacking

Why this is awesome: You can practically hear that Wikepedian's sphincter tighten as you engage in an edit war over Lady Gaga's man parts. (But seriously, has anyone ever seen Lady G. and Zach G. in the same room at the same time?)

Why you shouldn't do it: You could be banned from editing any more entries. Also, an entire generation of 5th graders may grow up thinking that the capital of Arkansas is Bozoville.

5. Tear Down This Paywall

You want how much for that subscription to CrapICanReadElsewhereForFree.com? Uh, no thanks. I'll just use someone else's log-in and password. And what better way to do it than with BugMeNot?

That's where you'll find user names and passwords for both pay and free sites like NYTimes.com, WashingtonPost.com, IMDB, and YouTube. (No, PCWorld.com isn't one of them -- sorry.) Even if the site is free, BugMeNot will allow you to leave devastating ripostes in an article's comments section without having to surrender your real name or e-mail address.

Why this is awesome: Aside from avoiding subscription fees (you skinflint), you won't get spammed with advertising offers that "may interest you" or banned by sanctimonious comments czars (you know who you are).

Why you shouldn't do it: You'll be hammering another nail into the coffin of real journalism. And you'll feel bad. Trust us.

6. Hijack Someone Else's Facebook or Twitter Account

Find yourself loitering in Internet cafés or airport lounges with time to kill? Why not hack into your neighbor's Facebook or Twitter account? Just install Firesheep and log on to a public Wi-Fi network; Firesheep alerts you when someone is attempting to log on via an unencrypted connection and snatches their browser cookie out of thin air. Double-click the cookie inside Firesheep, and you're in like Flynn (or whomever else you want to impersonate--Howard Zinn, maybe?). What you do from there is up to you and your conscience.

(To avoid suffering the same fate, you can install the Force TLS plug in to encrypt communications over public Wi-Fi.)

Why this is awesome: Everyone has a little voyeur inside them--but really the only reason we included this item was so we could tell you about Force TLS.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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