15 Awesome Things You Probably Shouldn't Do

Want to unlock your iPhone or hack a stranger's Facebook account? It's all possible, but it's also all against the rules.

By , PC World |  Hardware, Facebook, hacking

Nope. They're just fakes--Twitter accounts designed to fool the masses into imagining that they've stumbled upon the ruminations of the celebutard in question. Some are obvious parodies; others are just clever (or evil) imitations. Because if you're going to waste time on Twitter, you might as well mess with people's minds while you're there. Isn't that why Al Gore invented the InterWebs?

Why this is awesome: Like @BPGlobalPR, you could achieve 15 minutes of Internet fame by skewering an evil multinational corporation while delighting thousands.

Why you shouldn't do it: If Twitter finds out that the account is bogus--and is clearly not a parody -- it will suspend the account. And as with hacked Facebook accounts, you could be held liable for defamation or trademark violations, depending on what you do. So phweet with care.

9. Make E-Mail Vanish

If you have something confidential to say, e-mail is probably the worst vehicle to say it, because copies of it are everywhere--on your PC, on your recipient's machine, and on many of the servers that it touched along the way. The same warning applies to text messages on your phone.

Want to keep those convos on the QT? Try VaporStream, a Web-based service that lets you send messages that cannot be stored, copied, or forwarded. VaporStream won't even display the sender/receiver and message contents on the same screen (so taking a screen shot of a message won't mean squat). And once the recipient finishes reading a message, it self-destructs--permanently. The cost? A mere $7.50 a month, though both the sender and the recipient must have VaporStream accounts.

Why this is awesome: If the message doesn't exist, Johnny Law can't get his grubby fingers on it. For their part, law-abiding citizens can send proprietary or confidential information without worrying about leaks, and they can avoid the cost of storing messages.

Why you shouldn't do it: If you work in an industry (like financial services or healthcare) that requires you maintain records of all communications, you could be breaking the law--and we will disavow any knowledge of your actions.

10. Spy on Someone's Texts


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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