Advanced energy research projects are hot

By Michael Cooney, Network World |  Hardware, energy

Silicon Valley utility offers customers $250,000 for unique energy technology

A California utility is offering two, $250,000 rewards to customers that can show off a new technology or technique for saving energy. Silicon Valley Power said it will pay grants to customers who implement what it calls "exceptionally creative uses of energy technology." The group said winners will be paid based on either a cent per kilowatt-hour or percent of project cost up to a $250,000 limit per customer and a program total $500,000.

IBM, researchers get 24 million DoE supercomputer hours to develop controversial lithium air battery

The DoE and IBM are serious about developing lithium air batteries capable of powering a car for 500 miles on a single charge - a five-fold increase over current plug-in batteries that have a range of about 40 to 100 miles, the DoE said. The agency said 24 million hours of supercomputing time out of a total of 1.6 billion available hours at Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories will be used by IBM and a team of researchers from those labs and Vanderbilt University to design new materials required for a lithium air battery. The calculations will be performed at Oak Ridge and Argonne, which house two of the world's top 10 fastest computers, the group said.

How to migrate to Energy Efficient Ethernet

The IEEE's 802.3az standard for Energy Efficient Ethernet is expected to be finalized by next year, but it's not too soon to think about how your IT organization can migrate to EEE. EEE is designed to slash power usage by powering down Ethernet links when idle but enable them to spring back to life when called upon. The University of New Hampshire InterOperability lab has begun testing products based on the draft standard.

Researchers targeting smartphone energy efficiency

While smartphone headlines are dominated by the latest and greatest devices, from Sprint's new 3G/4G phone - the HTC EVO 4G - to Apple's anticipated new iPhone, a pair of university researchers have quietly been awarded a $1.2 million National Science Foundation grant to address the most vexing thing about mobile phones: short battery life. With smartphones being used for so much more than voice calls and e-mails these days, the four-year research project by a pair of Florida State University computer science professors and a cohort at the University of Pittsburgh is ever more pressing.

Recovery Act has bolstered energy technology, VP Biden says


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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