Can we blame the iPad yet for slowing PC sales?

Doom-and-gloom PC prophecies tend to blame the iPad for laptop declines, but IDC and Gartner aren't sounding the alarms

By Jared Newman, PC World |  Hardware, ipad, PC sales

Doom-and-gloom PC prophecies tend to blame the iPad for laptop declines, but IDC and Gartner aren't sounding the alarms just yet.

Both firms placed only partial blame on Apple's tablet for lower-than-expected PC shipments, which in the United States fell by 6.6% over the last three months according to Gartner and 4.8% according to IDC. Among the contributing factors besides the iPad, according to the two firms: tight recession spending, a waning netbook market and decisions to spend discretionary income on other things besides a PC upgrade.

(Belt-tightening, by the way, didn't seem to affect Apple's Mac sales, which grew at a higher rate over the last three months than the same period last year.)

As Apple Insider notes, both firms seemed careful to avoid calling out the iPad specifically for the PC market's woes, using the term "media tablet" instead and labeling it as one product people might decide to buy instead of a laptop. Speaking to Computerworld, Gartner analyst Mikako Kitagawa resisted the term "cannibalization" to describe the iPad's impact, saying that people were putting off PC purchases after buying the tablet, but not replacing the PC outright.

I agree with Apple Insider that avoiding mentions of the iPad when discussing tablets seems silly, given that most other vendors are just now finalizing their tablet plans. But the research firms aren't ignoring the tablets either. IDC research director David Daoud said in a statement to Computerworld that "a wave of media tablets could put a dent in the traditional PC market."

That's the right call. New categories of computer products are always going to have an affect on existing products -- back when netbooks were the hot trend, talk of laptop cannibalization abounded -- and the only way the iPad would be an exception is if people were not interested at all. Clearly, that's not the case.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Ask a Question
randomness