Look, no hands! G.tec uses brain interface to tweet

Guger Technologies' intendiX brain-computer interface lets you type messages simply by staring at letters on a screen

By , IDG News Service |  Hardware, CeBIT

Austrian company Guger Technologies (g.tec) has developed a brain-computer interface that can be used to "type" short text messages simply by staring at letters on a screen.

The interface could be used by people who are able to move only their eyes, allowing them to speak, via text-to-speech software, or to send short messages to other computer systems, including social networks, according to the company. It is demonstrating the system at Cebit.Labs, a section of the Cebit trade show devoted to research projects.

[ VIDEO: Brain control can type letters ]

The system, called intendiX, consists of a tight-fitting skull cap fitted with a number of electroencephalograph (EEG) electrodes, a pocket-sized brainwave amplifier, and a Windows application that analyzes and decodes the brainwaves. The amplifier can be connected to the PC via Bluetooth, so the user doesn't have to sit next to the PC. The company's target users will need help from a family member or caregiver to put on the cap.

Traditional EEG analysis systems require hours of training time to learn the user's normal brainwave patterns and identify key variations, but intendiX can gather sufficient data after just five to 10 minutes of use, said Markus Bruckner, an engineer who works in support and research at g.tec.

IntendiX works by watching out for a brainwave pattern known as P300 ERP (event-related potential), which appears around 300 milliseconds after a stimulus such as the appearance of a bright light.

"It's the same signal when you see a car's brake lights in front of you," said Bruckner.

To enter a message using intendiX, the user must stare at each of its letters in turn on a virtual keyboard displayed on a screen. The software flashes each of the columns of letters in turn until the user's brain reacts to the flash of the column containing the chosen letter, then it flashes each of the rows in turn until it detects a response: It then "types" the letter at the intersection of the row and column detected.

"It takes 40 seconds per character in the beginning, but in the lab we have speeded up to 0.9 seconds per character," said Bruckner.

It's taken over two decades to get this far: In their 1988 scientific paper, "Talking off the top of your head: A mental prosthesis utilizing event-related brain potentials," Larry Farwell and Emanuel Donchin reported that "The characters can be communicated with reliability at the rate of 1 character every 26 seconds, or 2.3 characters a minute" by detecting variations in the P300 brainwave in response to the flashing of a 6-by-6 grid of letters and symbols.

Farwell and Donchin saw their "mental prosthesis" as a way to help people suffering from "locked-in syndrome" to summon caregivers or communicate their needs.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness