Chip makers start to resume work in Japan

Fujitsu, NEC, Panasonic, Toshiba and others slowly begin to resume chip, high-tech production after devastation

By , Computerworld |  Hardware, business continuity, disaster recovery

And while Toshiba, which is headquartered in Tokyo, is moving some production, including semiconductor manufacturing, to alternative facilities, the company has two semiconductor facilities up and running. However, both received "minor damage" during the disaster.

The semiconductor, electronic device and PC manufacturer reported that Toshiba Mobile Display, a wholly-owned subsidiary and maker of mid- and small-sized LCD displays, expects to take about a month before it get its manufacturing line in Fukaya up and running.

While the company is focused on becoming fully operational again, executives are concerned about getting the supplies they need to build their products.

"Every effort is being made to secure materials and parts and to minimize impacts on production," the company said. "Toshiba is investigating available stock, including channel inventory, parts and half-finished goods; negotiating with suppliers to switch production to locations outside the affected region; and promoting adoption of substitutes."

Renesas Electronics, which builds computer chips used in automobiles and consumer devices, partially resumed operations at five of its chip plants, and several more are expected to go back online, at least in a limited capacity, once the blackouts are over.

However, the company's Naka factory has been temporarily shut down and engineers are assessing the status of the facility's clean room for its 300mm wafer fabrication line.

Panasonic and NEC both reported Wednesday that they restarted production at some factories that had been halted after the earthquake.

Sharon Gaudin covers the Internet and Web 2.0, emerging technologies, and desktop and laptop chips for Computerworld. Follow Sharon on Twitter at @sgaudin or subscribe to Sharon's RSS feed . Her e-mail address is sgaudin@computerworld.com .

Read more about processors in Computerworld's Processors Topic Center.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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