Review: Samsung Series 5 Chromebook

Maybe it's just ahead of its time, or maybe the world will never want a laptop that does little more than run a browser.

By Jason Cross, PC World |  Hardware, Chrome OS, Chromebook

Chrome OS is here. The Series 5 from Samsung is the first of the so-called Chromebooks, and I'm not sure it's exactly what we all had in mind when Google announced Chrome OS two years ago. Back then, our imaginations pictured computers that were thinner and lighter than those with enough horsepower to run Windows. We thought we would see computers running on ARM processors, not just x86. We were promised it would look like the Chrome browser with "a new windowing system." Frankly, I'm not sure we really knew what to expect. But if someone had told us, back then, that the first Chromebook would be a large and simple netbook that does little more than run only the Chrome browser, I don't think we would have made such a big deal about Google producing its own operating system.

The Hardware

The Samsung Series 5 is a 12.1-inch netbook with a pretty sleek, very rounded design. In fact, one could say it's the first true netbook, as it is perhaps the first mass-market laptop designed solely to get you on the 'net. It's powered by an Intel Atom N570 dual-core CPU, has 2GB of RAM, and a 16GB solid state drive. The left side houses a small power plug, air vent, and headset/mic jack, with a USB port and a proprietary port for a VGA dongle hidden behind a plastic door. Another USB port and a SIM card slot, behind another plastic door, lie along the right edge. An SD card reader graces the front. It's all fairly basic, as laptop hardware goes. There's no Ethernet port, no Bluetooth, no digital video output, and the keyboard isn't backlit.

What's there is pretty useable, at least from a hardware perspective. The keyboard's keys are large, spaced out well, and easy to type on. The clickpad is quite big and tracks nicely. The HD webcam works as well as most, but of course you're limited to using it in web apps (which means no Skype). The display has a glossy border, but the screen itself has a matte finish that reduces reflections. It gets pretty bright, but the color gamut and contrast doesn't seem that impressive, and something about the white balance looks a little...odd. Everything seems to have a slightly bluish tinge to it, most noticeable when you're looking at light grey areas. There's something soft about the way Chrome OS renders fonts, too.

Used to a particular Function key shortcut? There are no function keys. There's no delete key either, for that matter, though you can hold down ALT while pressing backspace to delete characters in front of the cursor. Google has excised the Caps Lock key in favor of a Search key, too. Used to touchpad gestures? The only one supported is two-finger scrolling. There's no pinch-to-zoom, no swiping to go back or forward.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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